Haworthia splendens

Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens J.D.Venter & S.A.Hammer

splendens
: splendid

H. splendens
is without any doubts one of the nicest and most atractive plant. It has stemless rosette, slowly proliferous. It is almost necessity to have in your collection a couple of this nature beauties.
Habitat looks very unassuming from far away - H. splendens grows on an elevation covered with shrub and grass, but from closer, some stones among grass marks ideal habitat for Haworthias.


Distribution map

H. splendens
is growing in two localities West from Albertinia. One was almost destroyed, few plants (lets say 20 plants) are remaining. Second population is much larger and healthier with almost 200 plants. But in recent time was this population threatened by some illegal collection, farming activities and also porcupines "activities". Luckily there was a project of BCSS and Haworthia Society, which provided fencing the area (75m x 50m) a keep all predators outside and protect the species for the future generation. Thanks to this!!! We have visited the locality again in October 2012 to observe the fenced area. Plants are in excellent condition,  well done. There is another spot not far away with smaller population - see my older photos from Soutpankoppies North. I call the fenced area Soutpankoppies South. Amongst normal splendens is growing a natural hybrid with H. floribunda var. dentata. See photos below. You can see there several degrees of hybridization. Some of the hybrids are very attractive.

There were several discoveries on surrounding area, but no other true H. splendens was found. For example: plants from the East of Albertinia are now described as H. esterhuizenii, other population more to the East is described as H. vincentii. There is a strange population virtually only few km to the East from splendens locality, here the population seems to be an intermediate between dekenahii and splendens - this was described as H. fusca.


H. splendens is not difficult to grow. Propagation can by done by seeds or leaf cuttings. If you will grow them uder to much shadow, they can loose its markings.

Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies North, W. Albertinia
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies North, W. Albertinia
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies North, W. Albertinia
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies North, W. Albertinia
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies North, W. Albertinia
Locality of H. splendens, Soutpankoppies North, W. Albertinia
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
recently fenced area at locality of H. splendens, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Haworthia splendens X H. floribunda, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
H. splendens X floribunda, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
H. splendens X floribunda, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
H. splendens X floribunda, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
H. splendens X floribunda, Soutpankoppies South, W. Albertinia, NEW PHOTO
Synonym:
H. magnifica var. splendens

Known localities:
  • NW. Albertinia (3421BC)
  • Albertinia (3421BC)
  • W. Albertinia (3421BC)
  • Snymanskraal (3421BC)

3 comments:

Liripoop said...

A fascintating plants - looks like stones. Is it a type of cactus or succulent?

Kuba said...

RE: liripoop - Thanks, H. splendens belongs to succulents from South Africa. By the way - cacti are "part" of large group of succulents group. JIL

Anonymous said...

Cacti are also native to the Western Hemisphere. There is only one true "cactus" that grows in Africa- an epiphytic Rhipsalis that was probably a migrant on ocean borne plant debris or birds. Many plants in southern Africa "look" like cacti from a distance, but are actually very different up close.